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This Day in History - June 14

June 14

1381 – The Peasants’ Revolt, led by Wat Tyler, climaxes when rebels plunder and burn the Tower of London and kill the Archbishop of Canterbury

1642 – Massachusetts passes the first compulsory education law in the colonies

1645 – Oliver Cromwell’s army routs the king’s army at Naseby

1662 – English and American politician, Henry Vane the Younger, dies

1775 – The US Army is founded when the Continental Congress authorizes the muster of troops

1777 – The Continental Congress authorizes the “stars and stripes” flag for the new US

1789 – Captain William Bligh of the HMS Bounty arrives in Timor in a small boat, forced to leave his ship when his crew mutinied

1811 – American author, Harriet Beecher Stowe, is born

1820 – Editor, John Bartlett, is born

1846 – A group of settlers declare California to be a republic

1855 – Governor of Wisconsin and US Senator and Progressive Party presidential candidate, Robert Marion “Fighting Bob,” La Follette, is born

1863 – The Union is defeated at the Second Battle of Winchester

1864 – At the Battle of Pine Mountain, Georgia, Confederate General Leonidas Polk is killed by a Union shell

1886 – Russian playwright, Alexander Ostrovsky, dies

1893 – The City of Philadelphia observes the first Flag Day

1903 – A flash flood in Oregon kills 324

1906 – American photojournalist Margaret Bourke-White is born

1907 – Women in Norway win the right to vote

1909 – Folk singer, Burl Ives, is born

1919 – John William Alcott and Arthur Whitten Bowen take off from St. John’s, Newfoundland, for Clifden, Ireland, on the first nonstop transatlantic flight

1920 – German economist and sociologist, Max Weber, dies

1922 – President Warren G. Harding becomes the first president to speak on the radio

1925 – Press secretary for John Kennedy, Pierre Salinger, is born

1927 – Nicaraguan President Porfirio Diaz signs a treaty with the US allowing American intervention in his country

1928 – Argentine and Cuban physician, author, diplomat and theorist Che Guevara is born

1928 – British political activist, Emmeline Pankhurst, dies

1932 – Representative Edward Eslick dies on the floor of the House of Representatives while pleading for the passage of the bonus bill

1933 – Polish-American novelist, Jerzy Kosinski, is born

1940 – German forces occupy Paris

1942 – The Supreme Court rules that requiring students to salute the American flag is unconstitutional

1944 – Boeing B-29 bombers conduct their first raid against mainland Japan

1945 – Burma is liberated by the British

1946 – Real estate mogul and President of the US, Donald Trump, is born

1949 – The State of Vietnam is formed

1950 – 104th Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams, is born

1951 – UNIVAC, the first computer built for commercial purposes, is demonstrated by Dr. John Mauchly and J. Presper Eckert, Jr., in Philadelphia

1954 – Americans take part in the first nationwide civil defense test against atomic attack

1961 – English singer, songwriter, and producer, Boy George, is born

1965 – A military triumvirate takes control in Saigon, South Vietnam

1968 – A Federal District Court jury in Boston convicts Dr. Benjamin Spock and three others, of conspiring to aid, abet, and counsel draft registrants to violate the Selective Service Act

1969 – German tennis player, Steffi Graf, is born

1982 – Argentina surrenders to the UK ending the Falkland Islands War

1985 – Shiite Hezbollah terrorists hijack TWA Flight 847 over the Middle East, forcing the plane to land in Beirut.  They killed Navy diver Robert Stethem and dumped his body on the runway and demanded to know who the Jewish passengers were on board.  They singled out five passengers, which they thought were Jewish, but only one, an American, actually was.  They took the passengers to a prison in Beirut and they were held until June 30, and released unharmed

1986 – Argentine writer, Jorge Luis Borges, dies

1989 – Black Congressman William Gray is elected Democratic Whip of the House of Representatives

1995 – Chechen rebels take 2,000 people hostage in a hospital in Russia

1998 – Michael Jordan leads the Chicago Bulls to an 87-86 win over the Utah Jazz in Game Six of the NBA Finals

2003 – Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II publishes a list of those she has chosen to appoint as Officers of the Order of the British Empire as part of the traditional Queen’s Birthday Honours.  The list includes soccer star David Beckham, musician Sting, actor Roger Moore and actress Helen Mirren


Written by Crystal McCann

Crystal is the Chief Operating Officer of Lanterns Media Network and the owner of Madisons Media. She lives in Texas with her husband and dogs and is the proud mother of two adult children.


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