Blog

This Day in History - September 14

September 14

407 – Turkish Archbishop, John Chrysostom, dies

1146 – Zangi of the Near East is murdered and his son, the Sultan Nur ad-Din, moves to conquer Edessa, Greece

1321 – Dante Alighieri dies of malaria just hours after completing the writing of Paradiso

1544 – Henry VIII captures Boulogne, France

1769 – German explorer who developed the first isothermic and isobaric maps, Baron Friedrich von Humboldt, is born

1769 – German geographer and explorer Alexander von Humboldt is born

1773 – Aleksandr Suvorov and his Russian troops storm a Turkish fort at Hirsov, Turkey

1779 – American Colonel Daniel Brodhead concludes his assault against the Seneca Indians throughout the Allegheny Valley in Pennsylvania during the Revolutionary War

1791 – Louis XVI swears his allegiance to the French Constitution

1812 – Napoleon Bonaparte storms Moscow, Russia only to realize that it is abandoned and set afire by the few remaining Russians

1814 – Francis Scott Key finishes his writing of the “Star Spangled Banner,” waiting aboard a British ship in the Chesapeake Bay for the outcome of the British assault on Fort McHenry during the War of 1812

1836 – 3rd Vice President of the US, Aaron Burr, dies

1847 – US forces under General Winfield Scott capture Mexico City, virtually ending the Mexican War

1849 – Russian physiologist who studied the responsiveness of dogs, Ivan Pavlov is born

1852 – Prime Minister of the UK, Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, dies

1853 – The Allies land at Eupatoria, the west coast of Crimea

1860 – Author who wrote about the Midwest, Hamlin Garland, is born

1862 – Maryland Union troops close in on what will become the Antietam battleground, at the battles of South Mountain and Crampton’s Gap during the Civil War

1864 – One of the founders of the League of Nations and its founder, Lord Robert Cecil is born

1867 – Illustrator and creator of the ‘Gibson Girl,’ Charles Dana Gibson, is born

1879 – Birth control advocate and founder of Planned Parenthood, Margaret Sanger, is born

1898 – Film producer, Hal B. Wallis, is born

1901 – Vice President, Theodore Roosevelt, is sworn in as the 26th President of the US upon the death of William McKinley, who dies today after being shot by an anarchist

1911 – Russian Premier, Pyotr Stolypin, is assassinated at the Kiev opera house

1914 – Children’s author and illustrator, Robert McCloskey, is born

1916 – Italian troops attack Austro-Hungarian troops on the Italian front near the Isonzo River during World War I

1921 – First black woman to be appointed as a federal judge, Constance Baker Motley, is born

1927 – Dancer, Isadora Duncan, died

1930 – Writer, Allan Bloom, is born

1934 – Feminist and writer, Kate Millet, is born

1936 – Albanian-American Nobel Prize-winning physician and pharmacologist, Ferid Murad, is born

1936 – American screenwriter and producer, Irving Thalberg, dies

1940 – Congress passed the Selective Service Act, setting up the first peacetime draft in US history

1943 – German troops abandon the Salerno front in Italy during World War II

1944 – The US 1st Marine Division lands on the island of Peleliu in the Pacific to support General Douglas MacArthur who was preparing to invade the Philippines during World War II. The attack, known as Operation Stalemate, proved to be a disastrous and pointless mission in which more than 9,000 Marines died as well as 13,000 Japanese

1948 – Author and environmentalist, Marc Reisner, is born

1955 – Australian-American Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author, Geraldine Brooks, is born

1959 – A Soviet rocket, Luna 2, lands on the moon, becoming the first man-made object sent from earth to reach the moon

1960 – OPEC is formed by Iraq, Iran, Saudi Arabia, and Kuwait

1961 – Namesake and mascot for Wendy’s fast-food restaurants, Wendy Thomas Morse, is born

1964 – Author, John Steinbeck, receives the US Medal of Freedom

1965 – 3rd President of Russia, Dmitry Medvedev, is born

1965 – South Vietnamese forces and several US advisers parachute into the Ben Cat area north of Saigon during the Vietnam War

1966 – A training exercise known as Operation Attleboro, turns into a month-long fight against the Viet Cong during the Vietnam War

1968 – Detroit Tigers pitcher Denny McLain wins his 30th game of the season, becoming the first 30-game winner in the major leagues since 1938

1974 – Bob Marley’s “I Shot the Sheriff” hits the top of the charts

1975 – Mother Elizabeth Ann Seton becomes the first native-born American saint in the Roman Catholic Church

1979 – President of Afghanistan, Nur Muhammad Taraki, is assassinated in a coup in which prime minister Hafizullah Amin seizes power

1982 – President-elect of Lebanon, Bachir Gemayel, is killed during a bomb blast in Beirut, along with 26 others

1982 – Princess Grace of Monaco, also known as actress Grace Kelly, dies from injuries she received when her car fell from a mountain road near Monte Carlo

1983 – Grammy-winning singer and songwriter, Amy Winehouse, is born

1984 – Former USAF fighter pilot during the Vietnam War, Joe Kittinger, becomes the first person to pilot a gas balloon solo across the Atlantic

1985 – Japanese actress and singer, Aya Ueto, is born

1994 – MLB players strike over a salary cap forcing the cancellation of the entire postseason and World Series

1999 – Millions of people evacuate their homes as Hurricane Floyd heads toward them, moving across the Atlantic Ocean. Floyd will go on to kill from the Bahamas to New England, although Cape Fear in North Carolina suffered the most

2007 – Northern Rock Bank suffers the UK’s first bank run in 150 years

 


Written by Crystal McCann

Crystal is the Chief Operating Officer of Lanterns Media Network and the owner of Madisons Media. She lives in Texas with her husband and dogs and is the proud mother of two adult children.


0 Responses

Common Sense Constitutional Conservatives

Our mission is to provide fact-based, educational and useful analyses of today's current issues in an effort to unite Americans, regardless of party, around core principles of conservatism including individual liberty, constitutional originalism, personal responsibility, limited government and free trade and commerce.

Lanterns

We're here to fix the machine.

We are here to fix the machine. The machine is the federal government that has been fundamentally transformed the serve the elite instead of "We The People". Our goal is to engage our fellow Americans on the battlefield of ideas to discover the most ideal way for our nation to be governed to provide the most security with the maximum amount of liberty and freedom for all American citizens. We welcome all people from all walks of life and ideologies to engage with us. Join us on the battlefield of ideas.

Follow us